Issue 62 September - October 2014

Cancer and inequality: bringing the message home

Why do fewer people die of cancer in my neighbourhood than on the other side of town? Steve Buist of the Hamilton Spectator asked this question of his home city in southern Ontario, and used a variety of local data and sources to find answers. The story he told, using interactive maps and personal stories, won him the Best Cancer Reporter Award 2014. We reprint an edited extract.

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Issue 62 September - October 2014

Deconstructing evolution: can number crunchers find the answer to resistance?

Is there a logic, a pattern, a system behind the way cancer cells adapt to develop resistance to agents designed to kill them? Cancer research is calling on systems biologists to see if they can make sense of it all.

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Issue 62 September - October 2014

Shelley Dolan: walking alongside patients

Nurses are not the only ones who care and can nurture, support and explain things to patients who are scared and vulnerable, says pioneering cancer nurse Shelley Dolan. But they are the only health professionals to have this as their key role, and she is calling for Europe to do everything possible to empower them.

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Issue 62 September - October 2014

If you want better drugs consult a PRO

Our systems for evaluating new therapies are only as good as the accuracy of the judgements we make about how far patients benefit and how far they feel the burden of side-effects and other drawbacks. In this Editorial we welcome moves on both sides of the Atlantic to include patientsÂ’ own assessments into evaluation procedures, and draw attention to opportunities to engage with these efforts.

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Issue 61 July - August 2014

To treat or not to treat: who should decide?

Shared decision making is ethically sound and the evidence shows it leads to better outcomes. But if a patient is determined that they want no part in the decision, is it paternalistic to insist?

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