Issue 67 July - August 2015

The vitamin D question: whatÂ’s the best advice?

The beta-carotene fiasco warned oncologists off suggesting supplements on the basis of observational studies. But with vitamin D now in the spotlight, how should doctors respond when their patients ask if it could help?

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Issue 67 July - August 2015

Frederic Amant: building the evidence base for saving mother and child

Understanding the impact of treating the mother on the long-term health of her unborn child has long been held back by logistical and ethical obstacles to researching this rare patient population. Frédéric Amant took up the challenge.

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Issue 67 July - August 2015

Who should we screen for the BRCA gene?

Most people carrying harmful BRCA mutations only find out after they are diagnosed with cancer, and often not even then. Population screening is costly and the results can be hard to interpret. But should we do it anyway?

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Issue 67 July - August 2015

No easy road to outsmart cancer

Hopes of greatly speeding up the evaluation of new therapies by using tumour response to a short course of neoadjuvant treatment as a surrogate for clinical benefit have proved false and the sooner we recognise that the better. This is the message of the Guest Editorial written by Fatima Cardoso, Director of the Breast Unit at LisbonÂ’s Champalimaud Hospital.

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Issue 66 May - June 2015

Our cancer risk is not written in the stars

If Tomasetti and Vogelstein had not used the words “bad luck” in their paper on how ‘variation in cancer risk among tissues can be explained by the number of stem cell divisions’, the media might not have covered the story the way they did. In this interview with The Cancer Letter, Bertram Kramer, head of Cancer Prevention at the US National Cancer Institute, tries to clear up some of the confusion.

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